Friday’s Influence Magazine Articles


Today, over at InfluenceMagazine.com:

  • Chris Railey reminds ministry leaders that “Neighboring is essential in fulfilling the Great Commission.”
  • We share the awards our magazine won at the 2017 Evangelical Press Associationconvention in Chicago.

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The Blogosphere and the Problem of Authority


My wife Tiffany drew my attention to this article over at ChristianityToday.com. Tish Harrison Warren argues that the blogosphere has created a crisis of authority for Christians, especially for Christian women. Here’s her conclusion:

In his essay Sinsick, Stanley Hauerwas famously explores the notion of authority using a medical analogy. If a medical student told his advisor, “I’m not into anatomy this year, I’m into relating” and asked to skip anatomy class to focus on people, the medical school would reply, “Who in the hell do you think you are, kid? … You’re going to take anatomy. If you don’t like it, that’s tough.” Hauerwas delivers his crucial point by saying: “Now what that shows is that people believe incompetent physicians can hurt them. Therefore people expect medical schools to hold their students responsible for the kind of training that is necessary to be competent physicians. On the other hand, few people believe an incompetent minister can damage their salvation.”

The church has said for millennia that bad teaching is more deadly than bad surgery. Now we have an influx of teachers who become so by the stroke of a key. The need for formal structures of training, hierarchy, and accountability in medical schools and medical boards is obvious because we don’t want our doctors to simply be popular or relatable; we want them to practice medicine correctly and truthfully, participate in a medical tradition broader than themselves, and serve under the authority and oversight of others. We need to be as discerning in whom we trust with care of souls as we are with care of our bodies.

Christian writing and teaching is not minor surgery; it is heart surgery. In this new Internet age, we as a church have to recover the idea that, like doctors, Christian writers, teachers, and leaders can help cure or help kill. And therefore, like doctors, we have to ensure that all Christian leaders—male and female alike—have oversight and accountability that matches the weight of their authority and influence.

Read the whole thing.

Today’s Influence Magazine Articles


Today, over at InfluenceMagazine.com:

Please make sure to follow and like InfluenceInfluence magazine on Facebook, Twitter, and iTunes!

Alvin Plantinga Wins Templeton Prize


Yesterday, Alvin Plantinga was named as the 2017 Templeton Prize winner. Plantinga is a Christian philosopher, best known for his work in epistemology and philosophy of religion. I have read a number of his works, and to the extent that I have understood them, they have influenced me greatly.

Today’s Influence Magazine Articles


Today, over at InfluenceMagazine.com:

Please make sure to follow and like Influence Influence magazine on Facebook, Twitter, and iTunes!

Review of ‘A Murder of Quality’ by John Le Carré


A Murder of Quality is John Le Carré’s second novel as well as the second (of seven) in which ex-spook George Smiley plays a role. When the wife of a tutor at a prestigious public school is murdered, a friend of Smiley’s asks him to look into the case. Smiley’s attention—and everyone else’s, including the reader’s—is focused on a suspect until the very end when the truth comes out. Le Carré describes A Murder of Quality as “a flawed thriller redeemed by ferocious and quite funny social comment” in the Introduction to this edition, and the book is that, although I wouldn’t say it is fully redeemed.


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Book Reviewed:
P.S. John Le Carré, A Murder of Quality: A George Smiley Novel (New York: Penguin, 2012; orig. 1962).

P.S. If you found my review helpful, please vote “Yes” on my Amazon.com review page.

Review of ‘The Spy Who Came in from the Cold’ by John Le Carré


The Spy Who Came in from the Cold is a masterpiece. Set in the early Cold War period, it tells the story of the lengths a spy will go to for revenge. It is a testament to John Le Carré’s skill as a writer that even though we know the truth from the beginning—that protagonist Alec Leamas is putting one over on East German intelligence—we are carried along by his storytelling to the very moment when we discover that our “truth” isn’t even true.

 

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Book Reviewed:
John Carré, The Spy Who Came in from the Cold: A George Smiley Novel (New York: Penguin, 2012; orig. 1963).

P.S. If you found my review helpful, please vote “Yes” on my Amazon.com review page.