Evangelical Scientists Debate Evolution, Bible


Over at HuffPost Religion, Travis Loller writes about an interesting dialogue between Southern Baptist theologians and evangelical scientists at the BioLogos Foundation: Many Roman Catholic and mainline Protestant Christians today see parts of the Bible such as the creation as metaphorical, but for many evangelical Christians such a belief is untenable. Southern Baptist Seminary President Albert Mohler, a young-earth creationist, has called the attempt to reconcile evangelicals to evolution a “direct attack upon biblical authority.” Keathley, meanwhile, calls himself an old-earth creationist who accepts that the universe is billions of years old, but also believes that God directly intervened at … Continue reading Evangelical Scientists Debate Evolution, Bible

The World Wide (Religious) Web for Monday, June 6, 2011


The June 2011 issue of Christianity Today includes an interesting article, “The Search for the Historical Adam,” that examines contemporary evangelical views on the historicity of Adam and Eve from scientific and theological perspectives. Here’s a link to the American Scientific Affiliation articles mentioned in CT.My own fellowship, the Assemblies of God, is wrestling with these kinds of issues, which is why I found the article so interesting. The national office is hosting a Faith & Science Conference, June 27–28, 2011, in Springfield, Missouri. _____ Assemblies of God / Convoy of Hope relief efforts continue in Joplin, Missouri. Relief Efforts … Continue reading The World Wide (Religious) Web for Monday, June 6, 2011

The World Wide (Religious) Web for Thursday, May 12, 2011


What is the gospel? Dallas Willard’s answer: “How to get into heaven before you die.” _____ A Leap of Truth explores the relationship between Christian theology and evolutionary theory. _____ Allen C. Guelzo asks, “Whither the Evangelical Colleges?” Hunter Baker replies with a thither. _____ “Presbyterian Church to ordain gays as ministers.” The Rev. Dr. Janet Edwards, a Presbyterian minister, considers this a “moral awakening.”Mark Chaves, a sociologist of religion at Duke University, comments: “They’re making this change amid a larger cultural change. General public opinion on gay rights is trending pretty dramatically in the liberal direction.” On a (cor)related … Continue reading The World Wide (Religious) Web for Thursday, May 12, 2011

The World Wide (Religious) Web for Monday, May 9, 2011


This year is the 400th anniversary of the King James Version (KJV) of the Bible. Over at ChristianityToday.com, Mark A. Noll asks, “What would it have been like if the KJV had always been only one among several competing English-language versions of the Bible?”His answer: When the KJV became the cultural and literary standard for the entire English-speaking world, it was easier to focus on the literary excellence of the translation without stopping to face the divine imperatives and promises that are any Bible’s primary reason for existence. The pervasive cultural presence of this Bible also made it easy to … Continue reading The World Wide (Religious) Web for Monday, May 9, 2011

The World Wide (Religious) Web for Wednesday, April 20, 2011


Here are ten religious posts that caught my eye today: Lee Strobel discusses how Easter killed his faith in atheism. If you’re interested in the topic, check out N. T. Wright’s exhaustive study, The Resurrection of the Son of God, which—at 740 pages is not merely exhaustive but exhausting…to hold, anyway. Or read Michael Licona’s The Resurrection of Jesus: A New Historiographical Approach, which is 22 pages shorter. President Obama hosted an Easter Prayer Breakfast at the White House, and a reporter can’t help but note a political angle (in the penultimate paragraph). Personally, I cheer the president’s statement of … Continue reading The World Wide (Religious) Web for Wednesday, April 20, 2011