My Thoughts On Chick-fil-A Appreciation Day and National Same-Sex Kiss Day


Yesterday, August 1st  was Chick-fil-A Appreciation Day. Sponsored by Mike Huckabee, the purpose of this event was to “affirm a business that operates on Christian principles and whose executives are willing to take a stand for the Godly values we espouse.” Evidently, business was booming yesterday at Chick-fil-A stores across the country.

Tomorrow, August 3rd, is National Same-Sex Kiss Day. Sponsored by GLAAD (Gay & Lesbian Alliance Against Defamation), the purpose of this event is to “speak out against Chick-fil-A’s stand against the LGBT [lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender] community.” We’ll have to wait and see what impact both this event and the Chick-fil-A boycott have on the company’s bottom line.

As for me, I didn’t eat at Chick-fil-A yesterday. Although I support marriage and oppose same-sex marriage, I’m tired of the politicization of everyday life. Can’t a guy just eat—or not eat—his chicken sandwich and waffle fries without worrying what political statement he might be making? Can’t we carve out some politics-free zones in life where considerations other than legislation come into play? Or must we all become soldiers in the army of “the personal is political” and draw up battle lines accordingly?

Now, please don’t misunderstand me. Neither the August 1st nor August 3rd events are illegal. Each group has the right to support or to boycott whatever company it desires to. I can’t—and wouldn’t if I could—stop any group from exercising its rights of free speech and association. But I can opt out of that kind of politicization entirely, and I did.

This doesn’t mean I’m opting out of politics. I’ll cast my ballot this November and encourage you to do the same. I’ll engage in civil and rational argument about my preferred political values and policies, and I encourage you to do the same. And whether this election goes well or ill for my “side,” I’ll strive to love my neighbor and even my enemy, as Jesus teaches me to do, and I encourage you to do the same.

But I’m going to go ahead and eat waffle fries and Oreo cookies in good conscience, regardless of what politics their companies support, for the simple reason that they taste good. Doing so is my little rebellion against the divisive effect of the politicization of everyday life.

Here’s another little rebellion: If you disagree with me about my preferred political values and policies, let’s go to lunch and talk about them. Let’s prove that people can remain friends and enjoy meals across the political divide. The alternative—the politicization of friendship—is, to my mind, unthinkable…unbearable.

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In the matter of Chick-fil-A, it’s Mike Huckabee vs. Bert and Ernie


Can’t a guy just enjoy his chargrilled chicken sandwich, waffle fries, and sweet tea without politics barging in?

The comments about same-sex marriage made by Chick-fil-A President Dan Cathy a week ago continue to generate controversy this week, with politicians and fantasy creatures, well at least their handlers, weighing in.

“Guilty as charged,” Cathy was quoted as saying in the Baptist Press last week when asked about his company’s support of the traditional family unit as opposed to same-sex marriage.

“We are very much supportive of the family the biblical definition of the family unit. We are a family-owned business, a family-led business,” Cathy was quoted as saying.

That stance didn’t go over well with the Jim Henson Co., whose Jim Henson’s Creature Shop toys have been served up in Chick-fil-A’s meals for kids. Jim Henson Co. is named after the creator of the Muppets, though the company transferred the Muppets’ rights and ownership to the Walt Disney Co. in 2003, according to Jim Henson Co.

“The Jim Henson Company has celebrated and embraced diversity and inclusiveness for over fifty years and we have notified Chick-fil-A that we do not wish to partner with them on any future endeavors,” the company said in a posting on its Facebook page.

“Lisa Henson, our CEO, is personally a strong supporter of gay marriage and has directed us to donate the payment we received from Chick-fil-A to GLAAD (the Gay & Lesbian Alliance Against Defamation),” the Henson Co.’s posting said.

The posting, which is dated Friday, had drawn more than 10,000 likes and 2,000 comments as of Tuesday morning.

Also drawing numbers on Facebook was a page by former Arkansas Gov. Mike Huckabee, a 2008 GOP presidential candidate, which calls for people to turn out to Chick-fil-A restaurants on August 1 to show their support for what Cathy had to say about marriage.

“I have been incensed at the vitriolic assaults on the Chick fil-A company because the CEO, Dan Cathy, made comments recently in which he affirmed his view that the biblical view of marriage should be upheld,” Huckabee wrote on the page, which can also be found at www.ISupportChickFilA.com.

“No one is being asked to make signs, speeches or openly demonstrate. The goal is simple: Let’s affirm a business that operates on Christian principles and whose executives are willing to take a stand for the godly values we espouse by simply showing up and eating at Chick-fil-A on Wednesday, August 1,” wrote Huckabee. As of Tuesday morning, more than 88,000 people had indicated they would be heading to a restaurant on August 1.

The World Wide (Religious) Web for Tuesday, May 3, 2011


“Welcome to hell, bin Laden.” So said Gov. Mike Huckabee in the opening statement of his Huckabee Report. It’s a common sentiment, but is it a Christian one? James Martin SJ, asks, “What is a Christian Response to Bin Laden’s Death?”  Jennifer Fulwiler writes about “The Shocking Truth That God Loves [loved?] Bin Laden Too.” Jim Wallis argues that “it is never a Christian response to celebrate the death of any human being, even one so given over to the face of evil.” Joe Carter reminds us that “our relief at his death must be tempered by a Christian view of humanity. We must never forget that the evil comes not from the actions of “subhuman vermin” but from the heart of a fallen, sacred yet degraded, human being. If we are to preserve our own humanity we must not forget that our enemy differs from us in degree, not in kind. Like us, they are human, all too human.” Me? I think justice was served by bin Laden’s death. But in the back of my mind, I keep thinking of the scene in Unforgiven where the young man says, “I guess he had it coming.” And Clint Eastwood responds, “We all have it coming, kid.”

Perhaps you’ve seen the following quote from Martin Luther King Jr. on the internet: “I mourn the loss of thousands of precious lives, but I will not rejoice in the death of one, not even an enemy. Returning hate for hate multiplies hate, adding deeper darkness to a night already devoid of stars. Darkness cannot drive out darkness: only light can do that. Hate cannot drive out hate: only love can do that.” The first sentence of that quote is fake. The rest is authentic, however, taken from a 1963 book of King’s sermons called Strength to Love.

In re Rob Bell, James K. A. Smith asks, “Can hope be wrong?” Sample: “The “I-can’t-imagine” strategy is fundamentally Feuerbachian: it is a hermeneutic of projection which begins from what I can conceive and then projects “upwards,” as it were, to a conception of God. While this “imagining” might have absorbed some biblical themes of love and mercy, this absorption seems selective. More importantly, the “I-can’t-imagine” argument seems inattentive to how much my imagination is shaped and limited by all kinds of cultural factors and sensibilities–including how I “imagine” the nature of love, etc. The “I-can’t-imagine” argument makes man the measure of God, or at least seems to let the limits and constraints of “my” imagination trump the authority of Scripture and interpretation. I take it that discipleship means submitting even my imagination to the discipline of Scripture. (Indeed, could anything be more countercultural right now than Jonathan Edwards’ radical theocentrism, with all its attendant scandals for our modern sensibilities?)”

“Do Your Political Views Affect Your Religious Beliefs?” Uh, shouldn’t that be the other way around?

Make sure to read David Weiss’s article, “God of the Schizophrenic.” I liked this passage: “My faith in God has always been an important part of my life. I am not a saint. I have prejudices and flaws. But as a Christian, I wish fellow churchgoers would refrain from passing judgment and recommending a fix after two minutes of conversation.” Yep.

Anthony Bradley raises some interesting questions in his article, “Evangelicalism’s Narcissism Epidemic.” Here’s the penultimate sentence: “I hate to sound overly simplistic, but I am beginning to wonder if we undermine the mystery of the Christian life by adding extra tasks, missions, and principles that are not in the Bible and burn people out in the process, making Christianity a burden.”

J.E. Dyer argues, “Don’t Be Satisfied with Tolerance.” Personally, I never was.

Over at Patheos.com, John Fea is writing a four-part series on the Civil War as a war between two “Christian nations.” Part 1: “One Nation, Under God, Indivisible.” Part 2: “God’s Judgment upon the South.” Part 3: “The Confederacy’s Christian Nation.” If this series doesn’t sharpen your sense of the irony of history, then your irony-o-meter is broken.

I’ve been thinking about the Bishop of London’s homily at the royal wedding. I particularly liked this passage: “As the reality of God has faded from so many lives in the West, there has been a corresponding inflation of expectations that personal relations alone will supply meaning and happiness in life. This is to load our partner with too great a burden. We are all incomplete: we all need the love which is secure, rather than oppressive, we need mutual forgiveness, to thrive.” I wonder if he’d mind me borrowing that line every now and then.

Did you see the footage of the church verger cartwheeling down the aisle of Westminster Abbey after the royal wedding? Evidently, cartwheeling in a church after a wedding is a no-no in England, but I thought it rather appropriate. Shouldn’t we celebrate wedding with a little whimsy?

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