Wednesday’s Influence Online Articles


Today, over at InfluenceMagazine.com:

  • Stephen Blandino asks three questions to help you discover your core values.
  • We note a Gallup poll indicating that healthy eating makes for happy eaters.

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Review of ‘Tinker, Tailor, Soldier, Spy’ by John Le Carré


James Jesus Angleton, the legendary (and controversial) chief of CIA counterintelligence, described his work, borrowing a phrase from T. S. Eliot, as a “wilderness of mirrors.” In such a wilderness, it is difficult to discern between reality and reflection. Add the element of danger, and the wilderness induces paranoia in the viewer. The setting of John Le Carré’s Tinker, Tailor, Soldier, Spy is this wilderness of mirrors.

The story takes place in 1973. It opens with Jim Prideaux, former British agent, being hired as a substitute teacher at a boys’ prep school. “Control” (head of Britain’s intelligence service, MI6) has died, George Smiley (Control’s chief lieutenant) has been sacked, Operation Testify (Prideaux’s last op in Czechoslovakia) ended in abject failure, and “Circus” (MI6), has been reorganized under a new chief.

Then, a British agent named Ricki Tarr comes across information that the Soviets are running a mole in the Circus, who is code-named “Gerald.” Oliver Lacon, the Civil Service officer responsible for MI6 oversight, approaches Smiley and asks him to investigate. As the novel unfolds, Smiley discovers that there is a mole, he is a double agent feeding the Circus bad Soviet intel, and he is responsible for blowing Prideaux’s op.

It is a testament to John Le Carré’s skill as a writer that Tinker, Tailor, Soldier, Spy is a page-turner despite the fact that it contains so little action. Instead, the plot moves forward and the truth is revealed by means of conversations, flashbacks, and Smiley’s seemingly inexhaustible memory. Smiley walks us through the wilderness one mirror at a time until we see reality.

Tinker, Tailor, Soldier, Spy is the fifth of seven novels in which George Smiley plays a part and the first of Le Carré’s famed “Karla Trilogy,” in which Smiley matches wits with “Karla,” head of “Moscow Center” (the KGB). It is followed by The Honourable Schoolboy and Smiley’s People. Of the five novels I have read so far, this and The Spy Who Came in from the Cold (in which Smiley plays a small role) are the best.

Interestingly, Le Carré is releasing what is billed as a new George Smiley novel in September. It’s called A Legacy of Spies, and I look forward to reading it after I finish this series.

Book Reviewed:
John Le Carré, Tinker, Tailor, Soldier, Spy: A George Smiley Novel (New York: Penguin, 2011; orig. 1974).

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P.S. If you found my review helpful, please vote “Yes” on my Amazon.com review page.

Tuesday’s Influence Online Articles


Today, over at InfluenceMagazine.com:

  • Kristi Northup offers advice from hard-won experience about how to respond when crisis hits ministry families.
  • I interview Peter Scazzero about emotionally healthy relationships.
  • We note a Barna Group research finding that nearly half of pastors have experienced depression.

Please make sure to follow and like InfluenceInfluence magazine on Facebook, Twitter, and iTunes!

Influence Podcast with Peter Scazzero


In today’s #InfluencePodcast, I interview Peter Scazzero about emotionally healthy relationships. Scazzero is founder and teaching pastor at New Life Fellowship Church in Queens, New York City as well as founder of the ministry, Emotionally Healthy Spirituality. He is author of numerous books, including the forthcoming 40-day devotional, Emotionally Healthy Relationships Day by Day.

Thursday’s Influence Online Articles


Today, over at InfluenceMagazine.com:

  • Chris Colvin suggests five habits for getting out of the ministry bubble.
  • Mike McCrary offers four suggestions about how to finance your church plant. Mike is a friend and new colleague at the Assemblies of God national office. He is director of funding for the Church Multiplication Network.
  • John Davidson interviews Nick Wiersma of Convoy of Hope about how your church should respond to disaster.

Please make sure to follow and like InfluenceInfluence magazine on Facebook, Twitter, and iTunes!

Review of ‘The Looking Glass War by John Le Carré


The Looking Glass War is billed as “A George Smiley Novel.” It is the fourth installment in the series of John Le Carré books where Smiley plays a part, but his role here is very small.

The main story concerns the U.K.’s “Department” (military intelligence) competing with its “Circus” (political intelligence) for glory. The Department ran agents against the Nazis during World War II but has since fallen in missions, personnel, and funding. The Circus, on the other hand, seems to be gobbling up all those things. So, when the Department receives intelligence of a possible missile program in East German, it reactivates an old agent to confirm that program’s existence. The program doesn’t exist, the agent is captured but his fate left unknown, and Smiley is sent by Circus’ “Control” to communicate the reorganization of the Department.

While The Looking Glass War has some interesting bits about interdepartmental rivalry, the training of spies, and the perils of espionage to those who are carrying it out, on the whole, the novel failed to capture my imagination. I read it more out of duty than delight. Even Le Carré admits in his Introduction that it was received poorly by critics. After reading The Spy Who Came in From the Cold, this novel was a disappointment. Thankfully, Le Carré followed The Looking Glass War with Tinker, Tailor, Soldier, Spy, which I am currently reading, and that is a real page-turner.

If you, like me, prefer to read series’ novels in order, I can honestly recommend that you skip this one and go directly from The Spy Who Came in from the Cold to Tinker, Tailor, Soldier, Spy. You won’t be missing much.

 

Book Reviewed:
John Le Carré, The Looking Glass War: A George Smiley Novel (New York: Penguin, 2013; orig. 1965).

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P.S. If you found my review helpful, please vote “Yes” on my Amazon.com review page.

Wednesday’s Influence Online Articles


Today, over at InfluenceMagazine.com:

  • Karen Huber offers advice about how pastors can make sure their kids don’t run second to their ministries.
  • Yours truly reviews Multipliers (rev. ed.) by Liz Wiseman. Although this is a secular business book, I think it has application to church and nonprofit ministry contexts.
  • We note a Barna study indicating that 1 in 4 pastors struggle with doubt, especially early in their ministries.

Please make sure to follow and like InfluenceInfluence magazine on Facebook, Twitter, and iTunes!