Help! I’m in Charge | Book Review


The highest compliment I can pay Rod Loy for his leadership is that the better you know him, the better you think of him, both as a person and as a pastor. That’s not always true of Christian leaders, but it’s true of him. I can recommend his new book, Help! I’m in Charge, because I can recommend him as someone to listen to.

Help! I’m in Charge is the fourth book I’ve read by Rod. (The others are 3 Questions, Immediate Obedience, and After the Honeymoon.) According to the subtitle, it examines “stuff leadership excerpts didn’t tell you.” And that’s about right. Most leadership experts discuss mission, vision, and values from a 30,000-foot level, Rod gets into the weeds, talking the nitty-gritty of leadership on the ground.

The book’s chapter titles helpfully identify the practical topics Rod examines:

  1. You’ll Need to Get Comfortable Outside Your Comfort Zone
  2. The One Thing You CanExpect Is the Unexpected
  3. We all Make Monumental Mistakes
  4. Unresolved Conflict Never Solved Anything
  5. Your Ability Won’t Get You Far if People Don’t Like You
  6. A Leader Leads Everybody, Not Just a Select Group
  7. Don’t Go into the Poor Without a Lifeguard
  8. You Can Respond Stupidly or Wisely to Criticism and Correction
  9. Everyone Wants to Be Treated with Respect
  10. Great Leaders Are Willing to Sacrifice Their Rights

Chapter 5 was the most personally challenging for me. So much so, that I’ve written “Your Ability Won’t Get You Far If People Don’t Like You” on a sticky note and affixed it to my computer screen, which—because I’m an editor—I stare at most of my working hours. Leaders need to turn off their screens, get up off their chairs, and grab face-to-face time with others if they want to be effective. At least I do.

Here are some other passages in Help! I’m in Charge that I’ve dogeared: “How to Handle the Unexpected” (pp. ##), “How to Know Which Person Is in the Right” (pp. ##), “How to Become a Secure Leader” (pp. ##), “How to Bring Out the Best in Insecure People” (pp. ##), and “Reasons People Avoid and Resist Accountability” (pp. ##).

Rod is great at epitomizing matters, so there are a lot of helpful lists throughout the book. Chapter 9, “Everyone Wants to Be Treated with Respect,” outlines the differences between exclusive and inclusive leaders, for example. Sometimes, I’ll write that a particular chapter is worth the price of an entire book. For what it’s worth, I thought this entire book was worth the price of the entire book.

As with Rod’s other books, Help! I’m in Chargecombines helpful principles, biblical insights, telling anecdotes, and personal authenticity. For me, this is most evident in the Epilogue, which recounts how Rod and his wife Cindy responded when she was diagnosed with cancer in spring 2017. Cindy is healthy now, but they welcomed that experience as an opportunity to draw closer to God. By sharing it with their church, they invited others to draw closer to Him as well.

A leader who models how to follow God when life is hard is the kind of leader I want to follow, even if only by reading his book, which I think you should.

Book Reviewed
Rod Loy, Help! I’m in Charge: Stuff Leadership Experts Didn’t Tell You (Springfield, MO: Influence Resources, 2018).

P.S. If you found my review helpful, please vote “Helpful” on my Amazon review page.

P.P.S. Check out my Influence Podcast with Rod about the book:

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