In Honor of Reformation Day, Here are Martin Luther’s 95 Theses


On this day in 1517, Martin Luther nailed the following 95 theses to the door of the Castle Church in Wittenberg. _______________ Disputation of Doctor Martin Luther on the Power and Efficacy of Indulgences by Dr. Martin Luther (1517) Published in: Works of Martin Luther: Adolph Spaeth, L.D. Reed, Henry Eyster Jacobs, et Al., Trans. & Eds. (Philadelphia: A. J. Holman Company, 1915), Vol.1, pp. 29-38 _______________ Out of love for the truth and the desire to bring it to light, the following propositions will be discussed at Wittenberg, under the presidency of the Reverend Father Martin Luther, Master of Arts and of … Continue reading In Honor of Reformation Day, Here are Martin Luther’s 95 Theses

Happy Reformation Day!


On this day in 1517, Martin Luther nailed the following 95 theses to the door of the Castle Church in Wittenberg. _______________ Disputation of Doctor Martin Luther on the Power and Efficacy of Indulgences by Dr. Martin Luther (1517) Published in: Works of Martin Luther: Adolph Spaeth, L.D. Reed, Henry Eyster Jacobs, et Al., Trans. & Eds. (Philadelphia: A. J. Holman Company, 1915), Vol.1, pp. 29-38 _______________ Out of love for the truth and the desire to bring it to light, the following propositions will be discussed at Wittenberg, under the presidency of the Reverend Father Martin Luther, Master of Arts … Continue reading Happy Reformation Day!

Moby-Dick Published


October 18, 1851: On this day in history, Herman Melville’s “Moby-Dick” was published in London as “The Whale.” It was published in New York City on November 14 of the same year. According to a 2011 survey in American Book Review, the novel’s opening line, “Call me Ishmael,” rank’s first in a list of “100 First Best Lines from Novels.” Continue reading Moby-Dick Published

John Brown’s Raid on Harper’s Ferry


On this day in history–October 16, 1859–John Brown led a raid on the federal arsenal at Harper’s Ferry, Virginia. His goal was to seize weapons and ammunition and arm slaves for a revolt against their slaveholders. Thirty-six hours after the raid began, troops led by Colonel Robert E. Lee stormed the house where Brown and his men were holed up, captured them, and turned them over to Virginia authorities for trial. He was tried, sentenced to death for treason, and hanged on December 9. When the Civil War began on 1861, Union soldiers sang “John Brown’s Body” (also known as … Continue reading John Brown’s Raid on Harper’s Ferry

The Battle of Hastings


On this day in history–October 14, 1066–William, duke of Normandy, defeated King Harold II of England at the Battle of Hastings. Because of this battle, William became known as William the Conqueror. Just as Harold was the last Anglo-Saxon king of England, so William became the first Norman king. William’s reign introduced many changes into English society, not the least of which was the evolution, over time, of Anglo-Saxon and old French into the modern English language. Continue reading The Battle of Hastings

Roger Williams Banished


On this day in history–October 9, 1635, Roger Williams was banished from the Massachusetts Bay Colony because he questioned the colony’s politicized religion. In 1644, Williams went on to write The Bloody Tenent of Persecution, which laid out his critique of civil states enforcing religious doctrine or practice and his constructive case for religious freedom. In the preface to that book, Williams summarized his basic arguments: First. That the blood of so many hundred thousand souls of protestants and papists, spilt in the wars of present and former ages, for their respective consciences, is not required nor accepted by Jesus Christ … Continue reading Roger Williams Banished