Review of ‘Faith in the Voting Booth’ by Leith Anderson and Galen Carey


Leith Anderson and Galen Carey, Faith in the Voting Booth: Practical Wisdom for Voting Well (Grand Rapids, MI: Zondervan, 2016). Today (March 15), voters from Florida, Illinois, Missouri, North Carolina, and Ohio cast ballots in the Democratic and Republican presidential primaries. Since I am a Missourian, I performed my civic duty and cast a ballot along with them. Voting is so routine in American life that we Americans often take it for granted. We shouldn’t, however. It is a great privilege and an awesome responsibility. It also can be hard work. Choosing a candidate or supporting a referendum requires informed … Continue reading Review of ‘Faith in the Voting Booth’ by Leith Anderson and Galen Carey

Review of ‘Abuse of Discretion’ by Clarke D. Forsythe


 Clarke D. Forsythe, Abuse of Discretion: The Inside Story of Roe v. Wade (New York: Encounter Books, 2013). Hardback / Kindle On January 22, 1973, the Supreme Court of the United States handed down decisions in two abortion-related cases, Roe v. Wade and Doe v. Bolton. The effect of those decisions was immediate and radical. State laws prohibiting or restricting abortion were struck down, and a right to abortion at any time for any reason was established. The United States is now one of only ten nations (out of 195) that permit abortion after 14 weeks, and one of only … Continue reading Review of ‘Abuse of Discretion’ by Clarke D. Forsythe

Happy 40th Anniversary, Baby?


Yesterday, January 22, was the 40th anniversary of Roe v. Wade, the Supreme Court decision which invented a Constitutional right to have an abortion, striking down many state laws in the process. In celebration of that anniversary, the folks at the Center for Reproductive Rights commissioned this incredibly creepy video with Mehcad Brooks. Abortion is often linked to women’s rights, though early feminists thought it was a degradation of womanhood. (See Serrin M. Foster’s speech, “The Feminist Case Against Abortion,” beginning on p. 28 of this PDF). Ironically, this ad–to my mind, at any rate–shows the link of legalized abortion … Continue reading Happy 40th Anniversary, Baby?

The World Wide (Religious) Web for Wednesday, June 22, 2011


In “The Dangerous Mind of Peter Singer,” Joe Carter wonders whether there’s an ethical minimum that scholars need to meet before being treated seriously by others: While it is necessary to consider and debate unpopular views, there should be a minimum standard for ethical discourse whether on the elementary playground or in the lecture halls of Princeton. There are certain moral issues that are all but universally recognized as self-evidently wrong by those in possession of rational faculties. Rape is wrong, torturing babies for fun is objectively morally bad, and the Holocaust was not just a violation of utilitarian ethic, … Continue reading The World Wide (Religious) Web for Wednesday, June 22, 2011

The World Wide (Religious) Web for Wednesday, April 27, 2011


Psychologists discover “a statistically significant trend toward narcissism and hostility in popular music. As they hypothesized, the words ‘I’ and ‘me’ appear more frequently along with anger-related words, while there’s been a corresponding decline in ‘we’ and ‘us’ and the expression of positive emotions.” I am personally outraged at popular music’s narcissism and anger. Just kidding! Although I wonder what level of narcissism is present in contemporary worship songs. Al Mohler offers insights about why conservative churches are growing. Sure, evangelical churches are growing and the mainline churches aren’t. But what if the country as a whole is growing at … Continue reading The World Wide (Religious) Web for Wednesday, April 27, 2011