Mo Sabri: ‘I Believe in Jesus’


Mo Sabri is a Muslim who believes in Jesus. No, he’s not part of the insider movement. He’s a Muslim…who believes in Jesus.

It may surprise Pentecostal and evangelical Christians to learn that Muslims believe that Jesus, among other things, was born of a virgin, was commissioned to preach, ascended into heaven, and will return again to Jerusalem. Alongside these orthodox beliefs, which are reflected in Mo Sabri’s song, Muslims deny that Jesus was God incarnate and the atonement for our sins. So, from the standpoint of Christian theology (and of historical truth), the Muslim view of Jesus is deficient.

Still, what an interesting cultural moment we live in when a Muslim boy from Tennessee is introduced (in this video) by a Dallas Cowboys team member, declares his belief in Jesus, and closes his video with a quote from Roman Catholic theologian Hans Urs von Balthasar: “Even if a unity of faith is not possible, a unity of love it.”

Lyrics below the video…

Verse 1

This ain’t a song about bottles in the club
This is about a role model filled with love
A teacher, a preacher with guidance from above
Sent to represent a message of peace like a dove
In the west they call him Jesus, in the east they call him Isa
Messiah, Christ…the same person that you speak of
Ask me why I wrote this song I will tell you because
There’s too many people silent, it’s time for me to speak up
The son of a virgin, they say it is illogical
Probably improbable but God made it possible
Gabriel told Mary that her son would be phenomenal
His voice was always audible, The opposite of prodigal,
He overcame the obstacles, people attacking him
He was a walking hospital, with healing he was passionate
He cured the sick, raised the dead, shout out to Lazarus
I’m talking about Jesus of Nazareth

Chorus:

If we don’t have peace, we’ll end up in pieces
Treat people the way that you want to be treated
If you do believe it, sing it and repeat it
I am not afraid to say that I believe in Jesus

Jesus…I believe in Jesus
I am not afraid to say that I believe in Jesus
Jesus…I believe in Jesus
I am not afraid to say that I believe in Jesus

Verse 2

I’m just a follower of Jesus
What that means is: I follow what he teaches
I’m not the type of person that just wants to give speeches
I’m trying to be the person that will practice what he preaches

Yeah, ’cause I’ve observed people just say the words
But faith ain’t a noun, it is more like verb
That’s why I wrote this verse, to remind us to serve
‘Cause if you haven’t heard, faith is dead without works

How can we say we believe that God exists
If we always act the opposite, it’s ominous
How we only care about our own accomplishments, and we’re quick to break our promises
We gotta put a stop to this

We all sin, I know that we are human
But we cannot keep on using all the same excuses
Now it is the time we need to prevent the abuses
Listen up, I got the solution

Verse 3

Why does our religion always have to cause division?
In reality we’re all more similar than different
Jesus wanted unity, but nowadays it’s missing
We have to use our vision if we want to do his mission

Can’t we see we’re all children of Adam, brothers and sisters?
If you don’t agree, then you haven’t read the Scriptures
Picture when Jesus comes back to Jerusalem
Will he be happy with the way that you’ve become?

We’re living wrong but today’s a new dawn
So sing along to this song, like David singing the Psalms
Now raise up your arms, give alms with open palms
Jesus brought us a message to follow until we’re gone

Shout out to my dad and mom for blessing me in my youth
God’s essence is the proof that his message is the truth
And this song was just a lesson to remind me and you
To ask ourselves this question, what would Jesus do?

The Creed of Abraham Lincoln in His Own Words


20120704-111530.jpgThe Creed of Abraham Lincoln in His Own Words

By William E. Barton[1]

 

I believe in God, the Almighty Ruler of Nations,[2] our great and good and merciful Maker,[3] our Father in Heaven, who notes the fall of a sparrow, and numbers the hairs of our heads.[4]

I believe in His eternal truth and justice.[5]

I recognize the sublime truth announced in the Holy Scriptures and proven by all history that those nations only are blest whose God is the Lord.[6]

I believe that it is the duty of nations as well as of men to own their dependence upon the overruling power of God, and to invoke the influence of His Holy Spirit; to confess their sins and transgressions in humble sorrow, yet with assured hope that genuine repentance will lead to mercy and pardon.[7]

I believe that it is meet and right to recognize and confess the presence of the Almighty Father equally in our triumphs and in those sorrows[8] which we may justly fear are a punishment inflicted upon us for our presumptuous sins to the needful end of our reformation.[9]

I believe that the Bible is the best gift which God has ever given to men. All the good from the Saviour of the world is communicated to us through this book.[10]

I believe the will of God prevails.[11] Without Him all human reliance is vain.[12] Without the assistance of that Divine Being, I cannot succeed. With that assistance I cannot fail. [13]

Being a humble instrument in the hands of our Heavenly Father, I desire that all my works and acts may be according to His will; and that it may be so, I give thanks to the Almighty, and seek His aid.[14]

I have a solemn oath registered in heaven[15] to finish the work I am in,[16] in full view of my responsibility to my God,[17] with malice toward none; with charity for all; with firmness in the right as God gives me to see the right.[18] Commending those who love me to His care, as I hope in their prayers they will commend me,[19] I look through the help of God to a joyous meeting with many loved ones gone before.[20]

 


[1] William E. Barton, The Soul of Abraham Lincoln (Urbana and Chicago: University of Illinois Press, 2005), 300. This book is a reprint of the 1920 first edition published by George H. Doran Co. Chapter XXIII is titled, “The Creed of Abraham Lincoln.” The chapter consists of “a series of short quotations from documents, letters, and addresses, certified as authentic and touching directly upon points of Christian doctrine.” After presenting these quotations, Barton arranges, with minimal editing, several of Lincoln’s phrases into the form of a creed, quoted above in the text. In the notes below, I have linked the phrases to The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, the online version of Roy P. Bassler’s authoritative series of the same name. The online version replicates Bassler’s page divisions, so I’ve noted the page number of the quotation to aid in finding it in the text.

[2] “First Inaugural Address—Final Text,” March 4, 1861, 270.

[3] “To John D. Johnston,” January 12, 1851, 97.

[5] “First Inaugural Address,” 270.

[6] “Proclamation Appointing a National Fast Day,” March 30, 1863, 155.

[8] “Proclamation of Thanksgiving,” July 15, 1863, 332.

[9] “Proclamation Appointing a National Fast Day,” 156.

[10] “Reply to Loyal Colored People of Baltimore upon Presentation of a Bible,” September 7, 1864, 542.

[11] “Meditation on the Divine Will,” [September 2, 1862?], 403.

[12] “To the Friends of Union and Liberty,” May 9, 1864, 333.

[13] “Farewell Address at Springfield, Illinois,” February 11, 1861, 190.

[14] “Reply to Eliza P. Gurney,” October 26, 1862, 478.

[15] “First Inaugural Address,” 271.

[16] “Second Inaugural Address,” March 4, 1865, 333.

[17] “Message to Congress,” March 6, 1862, 146.

[18] “Second Inaugural Address,” 333.

[19] “Farewell Address at Springfield, Illinois,”190.

[20] “To John D. Johnston,” 97.