Media Gets Pope’s Abbas Comments Wrong | The Weekly Standard


I’m shocked–shocked!–that major news media misreported what the Pope said. Double-shocked (!!!) that it pertained to the Israeli-Palestinian conflict… If anyone needs further evidence of why the news agencies often can’t be trusted to report accurately on Israel and the Palestinians, and why major news outlets such as the New York Times and the BBC should stop repeating agency copy without verifying it, here is an important example from this weekend. Media Gets Pope’s Abbas Comments Wrong | The Weekly Standard. Continue reading Media Gets Pope’s Abbas Comments Wrong | The Weekly Standard

Later-Term Abortion and Science Denial


Over at Commentary, Jonathan S. Tobin writes: Instead of mulling whether the late term abortion ban (passed on the second anniversary of the sentencing of late term abortion butcher Kermit Gosnell for slaughtering infants born alive after such procedures) is politically wise for Republicans or a godsend to Democrats eager to replay their 2012 “war on women” attacks on their foes, we should be discussing the real life implications of medical innovations on public policy. The real issue isn’t the legality of abortion as a whole — which isn’t in question — but the lives of infants who could survive … Continue reading Later-Term Abortion and Science Denial

George F. Will on the Comprehensive, Aggressive, and Dangerous Threat to Free Speech in Contemporary America


George F. Will spoke at the Inaugural Disinvitation Dinner of the William F. Buckley Program at Yale University. His thesis? “Free speech has never been, in the history of our republic, more comprehensively, aggressively, and dangerously threatened than it is now.” Take a look! Continue reading George F. Will on the Comprehensive, Aggressive, and Dangerous Threat to Free Speech in Contemporary America

Justice Scalia’s Worst Opinion


Today is the 25th anniversary of Justice Anton Scalia’s opinion in Employment Division v. Smith, which Michael Stokes Paulsen describes as Justice Scalia’s Worst Opinion: Smith is not by a long shot the worst Supreme Court decision of all time, or even of the past twenty-five years. As a matter of the human harm it inflicts, there are far more egregious cases.Planned Parenthood v. CaseyandRoe v. Wade, the Court’s abortion decisions,top the listin the modern era. Nor isSmith the most indefensible of opinions in terms of the Court’s legal analysis.Roe,Casey,Lawrence v. Texas, andWindsor v. United States, each adopting and extending some form of “substantive due process,” are worse thanSmithon this score.Smithis … Continue reading Justice Scalia’s Worst Opinion

Abraham Lincoln, American Christians, and the Public Square


Last June, the Pew Research Center released a report entitled, Political Polarization in the American Public. Its opening sentence was alarming: “Republicans and Democrats are more divided along ideological lines – and partisan antipathy is deeper and more extensive – than at any point in the last two decades.” Obviously, people will have principled differences about big ideas and public policies, but those principled differences seem to be negatively affecting personal relationships. “Not only do many of these polarized partisans gravitate toward like-minded people,” the report went on to note, “but a significant share express a fairly strong aversion to … Continue reading Abraham Lincoln, American Christians, and the Public Square

Saving President Lincoln | The Weekly Standard


Jaffa put it like this, in a paragraph that distills Lincoln’s mind better than any words not written by Lincoln himself. If self-government was a right, and not a mere fact characterizing the American scene (more or less), then it must be derived from some primary source of obligation. There must be something, Lincoln insisted, inhering in each man, as a man, which created an obligation in every other man. And if any majority anywhere, however constituted, might rightfully enslave any man or men, it could only be because there was nothing in any man which, simply because he was a man, other men … Continue reading Saving President Lincoln | The Weekly Standard

The 151st Anniversary of the Gettysburg Address


On this date in 1863, Abraham Lincoln delivered the Gettysburg Address at the dedication of the Union cemetery in Gettysburg, Pennsylvania. Lincoln’s brief remarks followed the hours-long oration of Edward Everett, which has largely been forgotten. The Chicago Times editorialized embarrassment at Lincoln’s speech, but Everett himself felt that Lincoln had said more in two minutes than he had said in two hours. In less than 300 words, Lincoln surveyed America’s past founding and its then-present civil war, ending with the hope that its future would be characterized by a “new birth of freedom.” Four score and seven years ago our fathers brought forth … Continue reading The 151st Anniversary of the Gettysburg Address

Mozilla’s Orwellian Announcement about Brendan Eich’s Resignation


In 2008, Brendan Eich donated $1,000 to a group that supported Prop 8, which amended California’s constitution to define marriage as the union of a man and a woman. Voters passed the ballot initiative by 52 percent to 48 percent. In 2014, Eich–who created JavaScript and cofounded the Mozilla Foundation–became CEO of Mozilla Corporation. Because of his support for Prop 8, OkCupid (an online dating service), several Mozilla board members and employees, and Mozilla users called for him to step down. Yesterday, he did that. My purpose in this post is not to argue about same-sex marriage. For the record, … Continue reading Mozilla’s Orwellian Announcement about Brendan Eich’s Resignation